Evaluation of medicinal plants blend formulation for symptomatic relief, phytochemical and microbiological quality and safety

Authors

  • Aliyi Amano Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Abiy Abebe Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Eyob Debebe Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Debebe Worku Ambo University Author
  • Samuel Tesema Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Asfaw Meresa Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Terefe Gelibo ICAP at Columbia University Author
  • Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia Debre Markos University Author
  • Tesfaye Legesse Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Waktola Gobena Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Kaleab Sebsibe Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Tatek Kasim Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Desta Fikadu Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center Author
  • Muluken Philiphose Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center Author
  • Abdela Befa Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center Author
  • Beriso Mieso Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center Author
  • Hailu Gerkebo Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center Author
  • Samson Girma Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Asfaw Debella Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20372/ejphn.v6i1.355

Keywords:

Medicinal plants, herbal preparations, symptomatic relief, microbial quality

Abstract

Background: Medicinal plants are employed for the primary health care by the community as a supportive care for symptomatic relief of generalized pain, headache, fever, cough and others symptoms. This study was therefore aimed to evaluate blends of traditionally used medicinal plants for symptomatic relief effects besides determining the microbial and, phytochemical qualities and sensorial acceptability.

Methods: Laboratory animals-based experiment was employed in this study. The medicinal herbs blend preparations used as tea infusion were Cymbopgon citratus, Menta spicata, Thymus schimperi, Ruta chalepensis and Stevia rebaudiana. The essential oil blends of Rosmarinus officinalis, Salvia officinalis and Cymbopgon citratus in aqueous solution were used as oral gargle. The tea infusion and essential oils were administered as a single dose by oral gavage in mice. The doses used for analgesics effect of tea infusion were 350, 700 and 1400mg/Kg, and for the antipyretic effect of the gargle solution was five drops essential oil blends in 100ml distilled water. Oral gargle containing 2100mg/Kg tea infusion and five drops of essential oil in 100ml distilled water were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity in mice. The phytochemical and microbial quality and safety, and sensory acceptability were also investigated for medicinal plant blend preparations. Results were summarized as mean ± standard error of mean. The analysis was done using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The means values were compared using Dunnet’s t- test.

Results: The medicinal herb plant possessed analgesic, anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory activities. The presence of bioactive compounds that was attributed for symptomatic relief was indicated by quantitative determination of total flavonoids and phenolic compounds in the tea infusion and oral gargle solution. The results also showed that the microbial quality was within prescribed limits of international pharmacopeia and WHO requirements. The tea infusion and oral gargle had good sensory acceptability indicating accepted palatability.

Conclusion: The investigation verified the symptomatic relief effects of the medicinal plant blends besides meeting the phytochemical and microbial quality parameters requirements of the medicinal herb’s blends. The findings entails that the plants may be used to relieve pain, fever and inflammation.

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Author Biographies

  • Aliyi Amano, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Abiy Abebe, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Eyob Debebe, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Debebe Worku , Ambo University

    Department of Food Process Engineering and Post-harvest Technology, Ambo University, Ambo, Ethiopia

  • Samuel Tesema, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Asfaw Meresa, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Terefe Gelibo, ICAP at Columbia University

    ICAP at Columbia University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia,

  • Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia, Debre Markos University

    Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia

  • Tesfaye Legesse, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Waktola Gobena, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Kaleab Sebsibe, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Tatek Kasim, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Desta Fikadu, Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center

    Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center, Wondo Genet, Ethiopia

  • Muluken Philiphose, Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center

    Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center, Wondo Genet, Ethiopia

  • Abdela Befa, Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center

    Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center, Wondo Genet, Ethiopia

  • Beriso Mieso, Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center

    Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center, Wondo Genet, Ethiopia

  • Hailu Gerkebo, Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center

    Wondo Genet Agricultural Research Center, Wondo Genet, Ethiopia

  • Samson Girma, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Asfaw Debella, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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Published

2023-01-30

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Original Article

How to Cite

Amano, A. (2023) “Evaluation of medicinal plants blend formulation for symptomatic relief, phytochemical and microbiological quality and safety”, Ethiopian Journal of Public Health and Nutrition (EJPHN), 6(1), pp. 1–11. doi:10.20372/ejphn.v6i1.355.

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