Prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis and associated risk factors among people working in two Marble Stone Factories in Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia

Authors

  • Gebregziabher Berihu Mekelle University Author
  • Tsegay Wellay Mekelle University Author
  • Letekirstos GebreEgziabher Mekelle University Author
  • Alemtsehay Tewele Mekelle University Author
  • Yodit Zewdie Mekelle University Author
  • Hailay Gebretnsae Tigray Health Research Institute Author
  • Kindhafti Birhane Ayder Comprehensive Specialized Hospital Author
  • Mengistu Mitiku Mekelle University Author
  • Akberet Lemlem Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Adugna Dhufera Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Tesfaye Solomon Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author
  • Sintayehu Abate Ethiopian Public Health Institute Author

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20372/ejphn.v6i1.360

Keywords:

Marble stone factory, prevalence, pulmonary tuberculosis, risk factors, Tigray region, Northern Ethiopia

Abstract

Background: Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease caused mainly by Mycobacterium tubercule that causes severe public health problem in Ethiopia. Employees working in construction, mines and stone crushing are exposed to silica dust, and hence, are expected to be vulnerable to pulmonary tuberculosis. However, there is little information on the epidemiology of pulmonary tuberculosis in people working in construction and stone crushing marble factories. This study was, therefore, conducted to estimate the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis and to assess associated risk factors in employees working in Saba and Semayata Marble Stone factories, Tigray, Northern Ethiopia.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in people working in Saba and Semayata marble stone factories between February and April 2018. A total of 106 study participants were selected using simple random sampling and then screened for pulmonary tuberculosis based on cardinal signs and symptoms. Sputum samples were collected from participants with symptoms of pulmonary tuberculosis and tested with GeneXpert MTB/RIF for the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Associations of the potential risk factors with the prevalence were assessed using binary and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Variables which had a P value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant in the final model.

Result: The prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis was 1.9% (95% CI, 1.87-1.93). Work experience (AOR=1.48, 95%CI=1.03-8.58), history of contact with chronic coughers (AOR= 4.0, 95% CI=1.19-14.02) and loss of appetite (AOR=8.6, 95% CI=2.0-32.52) were significantly associated with the prevalence of pulmonary TB in people working in Saba and Semayata Marble Stone factories

Conclusion: The prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis among employees working in Saba and Semayata marble stone factories was relatively higher as compared to the Ethiopian National prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis, which warrants for strengthening of systematic screening for tuberculosis prevention and control activities in marble stone factories.

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Author Biographies

  • Gebregziabher Berihu, Mekelle University

    School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia

  • Tsegay Wellay, Mekelle University

    School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia

  • Letekirstos GebreEgziabher, Mekelle University

     School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia

  • Alemtsehay Tewele, Mekelle University

     School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia

  • Yodit Zewdie, Mekelle University

     School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia

  • Hailay Gebretnsae, Tigray Health Research Institute

    Tigray Health Research Institute, Tigray, Ethiopia

  • Kindhafti Birhane, Ayder Comprehensive Specialized Hospital

    Ayder Comprehensive Specialized Hospital, Tigray, Ethiopia

  • Mengistu Mitiku, Mekelle University

     School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia

  • Akberet Lemlem, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Adugna Dhufera, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Tesfaye Solomon, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Sintayehu Abate, Ethiopian Public Health Institute

    Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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Published

2023-01-30

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Section

Original Article

How to Cite

Berihu, G. (2023) “Prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis and associated risk factors among people working in two Marble Stone Factories in Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia”, Ethiopian Journal of Public Health and Nutrition (EJPHN), 6(1), pp. 42–48. doi:10.20372/ejphn.v6i1.360.

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